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HOLDING

ON

a project that began with a study of gestures through observation- through research and a series of interactions as survey, the meditation grew into a concept for a series of stationery and classes that hope to engage community in a playful way, eliciting memories of childhood, to refresh our eyes and bring new perspective to a mundane activity

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I envision a traditional Taiwanese classroom, with chalkboards both in the front and back of the classroom with wooden desks and chairs. Next to the podium at the front, filing cabinets contain folders upon folders of different "new papers. 

Enter the room and get seated. Upon which the professor instructs their pupils to each get up and choose an assortment of papers. At the beginning of the class, specific prompts are assigned varying from very explicit directions to things more vague and hoping to inspire creativity. After a series of exercises, the pupils are encouraged to participate in a show and tell, sharing their pieces and experience. 

The set of stationery and experience is designed to bring a new perspective upon something so overlooked in hopes to inspire the participants to do a double take on the most mundane activities, evoke new feelings in doing the same old and create a collective memory over a wholesome afternoon well spent. 

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Holding On is a project developed from experimental research methods exploring the body in relation to greater systems. Through the process of the project, I think the biggest take away for me is the joy there is to discovering new things about something you think you know so well already– unlearning biases, relearning simple tasks, seeing in a new way. I was most surprised to learn about the muscle mechanisms, both big and small, and the amount of training one must do in order to write in a neat manner. This training took years, all through our childhood and into our early teens. We take writing to be something so banal but forget it is actually such a sublime skill to have. 

This project is part of the Human Factors, Ergonomics & Interface course led by Ari Elefterin